Don't change your worldview based on one study

In the past few weeks, the blogosphere has been abuzz about the dangers of non-replication and the “decline” effect, triggered by Jonah Lehrer’s interesting piece in the New Yorker (mostly behind a firewall). The central claim in the piece is that initially strong or provocative findings diminish in strength over time. The decline [...]

Texting while driving -- really, folks?!

Silly claims that hands-free texting would somehow make it safe to text while [...]

Science or Sciencey [part 4]

The final part of a 4-part series examining what happens when science is used for marketing (using brain-training software as the central example). [...]

Science or Sciencey [part 3]

The third of a 4-part series examining what happens when science is used for marketing (using brain-training software as the central example). [...]

compensating for risk when driving

Do drivers compensate for distraction? Sometimes, but not when it actually might [...]

change blindness and courtroom testimony

A friend referred me to a wonderful case of a lawyer taking advantage of the limits of memory to try to get his client out of a traffic violation. It’s almost hard to believe this actually happened — it’s easier to imagine it happening on a television show as a critical plot twist. After [...]

Chess and the illusion of confidence

Chris and I have a column in Today’s New York Post on what we’ve called the Illusion of Confidence. In the column, we discuss now-classic work by Justin Kruger and David Dunning on the double curse of incompetence: People who are unskilled are also unaware of it. Kruger and Dunning showed that [...]